• 201007 Jan

    As you may (or may not) know, I’m an Invited Expert on the CSS Working Group at W3C. Mostly I talk about specs. But today, I’m going to talk about testing.

    W3C is working on test suites for the CSS specs, and I wanted us to have more web authors involved. Many of you have been frustrated with the inconsistent levels of CSS support across browsers, and I believe collaborative testing is one of the major ways we can improve the situation.

  • 200918 Nov

    Microsoft today offered developers an early glimpse of Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) at their 2009 Professional Developers Conference.

    Although only at an early stage of development, the IE9 team already looks to have made some impressive leaps forward in terms of web standards support, particularly with regard to CSS3 selectors which, by the looks of the image below (taken from the IE blog), IE9 appears to score an impressive 574 out of 578 in our CSS3 selectors test, a vast improvement over IE8 which scored only 330/578.

    CSS3 Selectors Test Results (courtesy of blogs.mdsn.com)

    CSS3 Selectors Test Results (courtesy of blogs.mdsn.com)

    IE9 also looks set to boast support for CSS3 border-radius, an improved scoring in the Acid 3 test (if only slightly) and support for HTML5. You can read the full announcement on the IE blog here and we’ll bring you further announcements on the subject as more information becomes available.

  • 200931 Aug

    Over the past few weeks I’ve received a number of emails from visitors to CSS3.info regarding CSS3 validation errors when using vendor specific extentions, for example -moz, -webkit, to implement CSS3 in their websites.

    This certainly isn’t a new topic, and in fact Joost de Valke first raised the issue on this website back in January 2007, however a glance over the W3C mailing-list archive highlights that this debate is still going strong, with a number of interesting ideas raised, and I thought it would make an interesting discussion point for the CSS3.info community.

  • 200927 Aug

    Microsoft announced on Tuesday that network managers can now upgrade any Windows PC’s on their networks to the latest version of Internet Explorer 8 via their Windows Server Update Services platform, clearly representing a significant time saver for managers of large networks.

    Does this easier to upgrade option mean that large organisations, businesses, schools, universities, colleges, etc., IE6′s last remaining stronghold,  will now finally be encouraged to make the move away from IE6?

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