• 201113 Apr

    With Internet Explorer 9 barely out of the labs, Microsoft yesterday caught many developers by surprise, with the launch of the first platform preview of the latest incarnation of their popular web browser, Internet Explorer 10, at this years Mix conference.

    The latest version of Internet Explorer, currently only three weeks into the development cycle, already boasts an impressive array of improvements, particularly in terms of CSS3 support, addressing many of the areas missed by IE9. For this release, Microsoft has paid particular attention to the CSS3 layout modules, with the platform preview offering implementations of the CSS3 Multi-column Layout module, the Flexible Box Layout module, and the recently announced CSS3 Grid Layout module.

  • 201118 Mar

    Opera have once again kicked their level of CSS3 support up a notch with the release of the latest beta version of their popular web browser. Opera version 11.10 beta, code named ‘Barracuda’, was first unveiled at this weeks SXSW in Austin, Texas, before being made available for download as a public beta yesterday.

    The most notable improvements to the browser, in terms of CSS3, are support for CSS3 multi-column layout and partial support for CSS3 gradients.

  • 201128 Feb

    Over the course of the last two weeks, the W3C CSS Working Group have issued three updated CSS3 specifications. The first sees the CSS3 Backgrounds and Borders module return to candidate recommendation, with the second and third providing updated working drafts of the CSS3 Text and CSS3 Image Values and Replaced Content modules respectively.

    The working group also introduced a new module, CSS3 Writing Modes, just over 2 weeks ago on the 1st February. This recent flurry of activity represents the first major updates to the CSS3 specifications since the CSS3 Color module was released as a proposed recommendation in October last year.

    Let’s take a look at what’s new. 

  • 201131 Jan

    CSS3 Icon

    The new CSS3 icon, part of the HTML5 brand (image courtesy of W3C).

    On the 18th January the W3C unveiled a logo and brand identity for HTML5 and associated technologies.

    The HTML5 logo and accompanying icons (shown below), including one for CSS3 (larger version above), are, according to the W3C at the time of launch, intended to be “an all-purpose banner for HTML5, CSS, SVG, WOFF, and other technologies that constitute an open web platform. The logo does not have a specific meaning; it is not meant to imply conformance or validity, for example. The logo represents ‘the Web platform’ in a very general sense.”

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